How the transformations in families impact women’s rights - UN Women launches Progress of the World’s Women 2019-2020 report in Georgia

Date: Thursday, November 14, 2019

As women’s rights have advanced over the past decades, families around the world have become a place of love and solidarity but also one where fundamental human rights violations and gender inequalities persist, according to UN Women’s report, “Progress of the World’s Women 2019-2020”.

On 14 November, 2019 UN Women in Georgia has launched its flagship report “Progress of the World’s Women 2019-2020: Families in a Changing World”
UN Women in Georgia has launched its flagship report "Progress of the World's Women 2019-2020: Families in a Changing World"; Photo: UN Women/Leli Bragonravova

On 14 November, 2019 UN Women in Georgia has presented its new flagship report “Progress of the World’s Women 2019-2020: Families in a Changing World” bringing multiple stakeholders to present the findings of the report.

The 2019-2020 edition of the report is an extensive assessment of the reality of families today, taking into account sweeping economic, demographic, political and social transformation. The report brings together global, regional and national data with in-depth analysis about core issues of concern, including family laws, income and employment, unpaid care work, violence against women, and families and migration, among others.

Anchored in global data, innovative analysis and case studies, the report shows the diversity of families around the world and provides robust recommendations to ensure that laws and policies support today’s families and meet the needs of all their members, especially women and girls, with analysis of what it would cost to implement said recommendations.

“Families can be a space where girls and women get support and empowerment or opposite, space where they are broken.” – said Shahra Razavi, Chief of Research and Data, at the launch of Women’s Progress 2019 in Georgia
"Families can be a space where girls and women get support and empowerment or opposite, space where they are broken." - Said Shahra Razavi, Chief of Research and Data at UN Women, at the launch of the report "Progress of the World's Women 2019-2020"; Photo: UN Women/Leli Blagonravova

“Evolving family structures provide an opportunity for governments to champion families and design, formulate and implement policies that support diverse household arrangements with equality at the core of those policies,” noted Shahra Razavi, Chief of Research and Data at UN Women.

“The Progress of the World’s Women 2019-2020 report helps to see the gaps, recognize them and advocate for women's rights in Georgia and elsewhere,” stated Tamila Barkalaia, Deputy Minister of Internally Displaced Persons from the Occupied Territories, Labour, Health and Social Affairs of Georgia.

The discussions at the launch of the report focused on identifying the resources in which a country would need to invest or reallocate in order to realize a package of family-friendly social transfers and services. Mira Bierbaum from the International Labour Organization zoomed in on the findings for Georgia, feeding into discussions on the introduction of family-friendly policies in the country. In two scenarios (based on available data), it would take between 6 to 9 per cent of GDP to provide a full package of family-friendly social transfers and services in Georgia, estimated the expert.